My granddaughter is going to be so excited when I show her these cute little tiger cubs. Living in Terre Haute, she has a yearly pass to the Indiana zoo and adores tigers.

Here is a photo of the Indianapolis Zoo when we went to visit last year.

Leslie Morgan
Leslie Morgan
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Of course, she wanted to ride the tiger on the carousel. The news of the new tiger cubs will make her very happy.

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Three tiger cubs were born at the Indianapolis Zoo

On May 27, 2022, the Indianapolis Zoo welcomed three new arrivals. The triplets, one female and two males were born to a 7-year-old Amur tiger named Zoya and a 14-year-old father named Pavel.

According to Indianapolis Zoo Public Relations,

Zoya is well and healing and the cubs are healthy and enjoying the TLC from the animal care team. . It is unlikely the cubs will ever be introduced to or in the same space with Zoya. Tigers are solitary by nature and Zoya is not raising them. Our animal care team is doing an amazing job hand-raising the cubs – they will be bottle-fed for 12 weeks.

Why is the birth of these tiger cubs so special?

The main reason is that Tigers are considered to be endangered animals. In some areas of the world, entire subspecies of tigers are already extinct.

While there are nine tiger subspecies, as of 2022, only six of these subspecies remain. Three species—Javian, Bali, and Caspian—have gone extinct, with the remaining six species endangered. And not only are tigers endangered, but their population is steadily decreasing.

- Brightly Eco

Because they have very few places left to live and breed in their natural habitat, Sadly, most tigers can only be seen at a zoo.
Canva
Canva
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Why are tigers going extinct?

 The problem and threat? Humans.
Tigers have lost an estimated 95% of their historical range. Their habitat has been destroyed, degraded, and fragmented by human activities. The clearing of forests for agriculture and timber, as well as the building of road networks and other development activities, pose serious threats to tiger habitats.

The more our human population grows, the more animals we will lose to extinction. That is why conservation and education through zoos are so important.

Take a look at these adorable newborn tiger cubs.

Indianapolis Zoo triplet tiger cubs newborn photoshoot

Just like human babies, newborn cubs need a lot of sleep.

Photo Credit: Indianapolis Zoo Public Relations
Photo Credit: Indianapolis Zoo Public Relations
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Zoo keepers will bottle feed the babies for 12 weeks.

Photo Credit: Indianapolis Zoo Public Relations
Photo Credit: Indianapolis Zoo Public Relations
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The babies are safe and well taken care of by the zoo staff.

Photo Credit: Indianapolis Zoo Public Relations
Photo Credit: Indianapolis Zoo Public Relations
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OMG! Look at the cute little face.

Photo Credit: Indianapolis Zoo Public Relations
Photo Credit: Indianapolis Zoo Public Relations
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Watch the tiger cubs at the Indianapolis Zoo in their tiger nursery

What are the names of the tiger cubs and when will the public be able to see them?

At this point, the cubs have no names. But the zoo says,

The Zoo will launch a community campaign in July to help name the cubs. Watch for that on social media. We will also put out weekly updates on the terrific tiger trio. The cubs will make their public debut at about 16 weeks in mid-September.

[Indianaplois Zoo]

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