Bees in general can get a bad rap for the pure fact that they're insects, and they sting (which can hurt)! But bees are really good for the environment, so if you see a swarm of them it's important to know what to do.

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Fred Corbett/Nikki Davis
Fred Corbett/Nikki Davis
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A Bee Swarm in Newburgh

Have you ever seen a bee swarm?  If you haven't seen one before it can be a tad jarring to see hundreds or thousands of these insects swarming in one spot.  Swarms can happen quickly too.  When Fred Corbett posted this photo on Facebook, he said this swarm quickly popped up over the course of two hours.

Fred Corbett
Fred Corbett
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So why do bees swarm?

Well, they swarm because they're forming a new colony. HGIC.Clemson.Edu had this to say about why bees swarm:

Swarming is the process by which honey bee colonies reproduce to form new colonies. When a honey bee colony outgrows its home, becomes too congested, or too populated for the queen’s pheromones to control the entire workforce, then the workers signal that it is time to swarm.

Nikki Davis
Nikki Davis
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The good news is that while swarms are common, they usually aren't dangerous, and are just temporary.  An article from Iowa State University states:

Honey bee swarms are not highly dangerous under most circumstances. Swarming honey bees feed prior to swarming, reducing their ability to sting. Further, bees away from the vicinity of their nest (offspring and food stores) are less defensive and are unlikely to sting unless provoked.

However, this situation was a tad more urgent.

Nikki Davis
Nikki Davis
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A Call For Help

In Newburgh, a family came home to find a bee swarm near their front door.  This was a tad urgent as one family member had an allergy to bee stings.  Luckily, local beekeeper, Nikki Davis was able to come right out and get the bees safely to a new location.

Fred Corbett
Fred Corbett
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Nikki shared a video about how she removed the bees, which you can see below.

What To Do if Bees Swarm in Your Yard

Bee swarms are common, and typically resolve themselves within a couple of days, so if they aren't in your way it's best to just leave them alone and let them do their thing. However, if you have a situation where they're in a place where you can't avoid contact with them, or like the situation above where there's a bee allergy that can make the situation extremely dangerous there are a few tips to follow.  Buzzaboutbees.net says:

  • Firstly, do NOT spray a pesticide or any other chemicals. This could provoke the bees, and is completely unnecessary. Also, given the difficulties faced by all bees including honey bees, let's take care to preserve them, and if possible, see if they can be relocated rather than destroyed.
  • Do not throw sticks, rocks or other items at the swarm in an attempt to drive it away!  You'll only aggravate the bees!
  • Do not attempt any other methods of 'bee control'.
  • Locate a local beekeeping group or association and contact them.

State Parks Near the Tri-State You Have to Check Out

As the weather warms up, all I want to do is be outside. We've got several state parks around the Tri-State area, they'd be perfect for a day trip or a camping weekend!