The closest I've ever come to a wild pig was at the Watermark in Nashville and a plate of roast wild boar in front of me.

WILD PIG ON A PLATE, PLEASE, NOT ON HUNTING GROUNDS

It was magnificent and it is the closest I ever WANT to come to wild pigs, which I know are a huge issue in the deep south. I've seen a documentary about the problems they cause. They're fast, mean, and aggressive--never a good combination. They've even been the source of horror movies, although I don't think it ever goes THAT far in reality. Besides, a few of them are played for laughs and what's happening in Kentucky is no laughing matter.

Get our free mobile app

A PROBLEM KENTUCKY DOES NOT NEED

Well, they are no longer JUST the deep south's concern. Wild pigs have made their way into Kentucky and the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is trying to figure out what to do about them.

And according to the department's website, putting a stop to the enormous nuisance they have become will be tricky. For one thing, it's already ruled out hunting the pigs due to their prolific reproductive habits AND the fact that they are smart.

Add "smart" to fast, mean, and aggressive and, well, you can see the serious dilemma unfolding. Kentucky Fish and Wildlife explains why they're so bad for deer hunters on its Facebook page.

DIFFICULT SOLUTION TO A DIFFICULT PROBLEM

But, again, hunting the pigs is out of the question, so KDFWR is asking for the public's help via trail cams. The agency has to know where to find them to begin rounding them up. And, yes, I'm assuming ROUNDING THEM UP is the only option since the ones that would seem most effective have been eliminated.

Kentucky deals with plenty of invasive species. Whoever brought wild pigs up from the south and dumped them into the Commonwealth...well...thanks a lot.

No roast wild boar for you.

Kentucky's Nuisance Animals

A couple of these creatures would cross over into the "dangerous" category, but the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife says that these are ALL nuisances, and with good reason.

LOOK: Here are the pets banned in each state

Because the regulation of exotic animals is left to states, some organizations, including The Humane Society of the United States, advocate for federal, standardized legislation that would ban owning large cats, bears, primates, and large poisonous snakes as pets.

Read on to see which pets are banned in your home state, as well as across the nation.