For as long as I can remember, I have always been fascinated with the night sky. The moon and the way it changes throughout the lunar cycle and the way it sometimes glows the brightest orange when full. It is truly beautiful in all its forms.

There is also something incredibly magical about knowing that the stars we see are masses of burning gas that are literally light-years away. Yet, they burn bright enough that we can see them twinkle in the night sky here on Earth. It reminds me that I am a small and rather insignificant part of the greater whole of our universe - something that can be a really important reminder when our worries and stresses seem like the most important thing in the whole world. It's nice to be reminded that there is more than just those things we fret over.

I have always found myself getting excited over celestial events - things like meteor showers or eclipses. I also get excited about planetary alignments, especially when we can see them with the naked eye. That's what made today's news from the Farmer's Almanac so exciting to me.

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In a post to Facebook, the Farmer's Almanac shared that tonight, April 13, 2021, Mars will be visible in the early night sky. Not only will it be visible, but it will be centered between the two stars that make the horns of the constellation Taurus.  If you're a stargazer like me, the post says we will need to look west to see Mars between the horns.

LOOK: Stunning vintage photos capture the beauty of America's national parks

Today these parks are located throughout the country in 25 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The land encompassing them was either purchased or donated, though much of it had been inhabited by native people for thousands of years before the founding of the United States. These areas are protected and revered as educational resources about the natural world, and as spaces for exploration.

Keep scrolling for 50 vintage photos that show the beauty of America's national parks.

 

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